fiona xmas.png
spreads (7).gif

Call for Palliative Care Volunteers in the Eurobodalla

The Eurobodalla Palliative Care Volunteer Service is calling for men and women over the

age of 18 from across the region including: Batemans Bay, Moruya, Tuross, Narooma and

Tilba areas to volunteer for their community.

Palliative care volunteers give support by phone, video calls or by visiting people in their

homes or place of residence, when a life is limited due to an incurable illness.

“Demand for palliative care in the home and in aged care is increasing. Volunteers are

needed from our community to support people, their family, and their carers as they deal

with what is a difficult stage of their lives,” said Fiona Sivyer, Project Officer of the Consumer

and Carer Relief at End of Life (CCREOL) Project, which is a collaboration between

Palliative Care NSW, Southern NSW Local Health District and COORDINARE, with the aim

of establishing local palliative care volunteer services across Southern NSW.

Death and dying, end-of-life, and palliative care can be difficult and sometimes confronting

topics. The volunteer’s role involves supporting people along the way, as they grapple with

these sensitive subjects. “Our volunteers provide one-on-one meaningful social support to

clients, their family, and carers. It‘s about maintaining the best quality of life until death”.

They also provide much needed carer respite. “Carers might want volunteer support so they

can have few hours break each week. They might want a volunteer to stay with their loved

one while they go have a shower or get to an appointment for example without worrying

about leaving their loved one alone,” Ms Sivyer explained.

“Having additional volunteer support means that carers can practice a little bit of self-care.

It’s the little things that can make a big difference.”

We are encouraging members of the community who would like to become a palliative care

volunteer to get in touch and become part of the program. Eurobodalla Palliative Care

Volunteer Dinah Lightfoot tells us it is a very special stage of life to be involved in.

“It’s an absolute privilege to be asked to be part of someone’s final stages of their life. The

role of a palliative care volunteer isn’t for everyone, there is a lot of listening to be done and

waiting for the right opportunities to help in a way that is right for the person and the family”

Palliative care volunteers come from diverse backgrounds. No qualifications or specific

experience are necessary for this role, and life experiences, excellent listening skills and

compassion are enormously beneficial.

“Working in palliative care is one of the most rewarding volunteer choices anyone can

make. Not only does it make a huge difference to the person who is dying and their family,

but also to the volunteer's own life. Volunteers learn to cherish each day, listen deeply and value life as a precious gift.”

Restrictions imposed by the current COVID-19 pandemic have left many clients and carers,

especially within in aged care facilities, feeling isolated and lonely. It has also forced services to reimagine how they can best provide social support whilst maintaining social distancing protocols. One solution is to use communication technologies to foster connections, but this can only work if everyone is comfortable working with the equipment and software required.

“With this in mind we are also calling for people to volunteer for IT support positions –

people who could assist volunteers, clients and carers to use a variety of communication

technologies, equipment and software.”

“This will enable many of the Community-based Volunteers to continue safely supporting

clients and carers if greater restrictions are need to be brought back into an area”, said Ms

Sivyer.

Successful applicants will receive comprehensive training, ongoing support, and supervision.

Volunteers will be bound by professional ethics of confidentiality and must obtain mandatory security checks.

For an Application Packs and further information contact Renata Sheehan, Community

Engagement Manager on 0477 322 107 or renata.sheehan@health.nsw.gov.au

Dinah Lightfoot

Palliative Care Facts

What is palliative care?

 Palliative Care is specialised health care which looks after people whose illness

is not curable. This is an illness that will eventually end life. It aims to give comfort

and support by managing pain and other symptoms so people can live life as well

as possible.

 Palliative Care considers the needs of the ‘whole’ person, including physical,

emotional, social, and spiritual needs. It also includes the support of carers and

families. Palliative care is not used to end life.

 Palliative care services referrals are available through the Southern NSW Local

Health District Central Intake Service - 1800 999 880.

 Palliative care can be provided at home, in residential aged care and in the

Southern NSW Local Health District facilities by families, GPs, non-government

care providers, community nurses and hospital staff.


COMMENTS : Due to the risks associated with comments from unidentified contributors that expose The Beagle to possible legal actions under the NSW Defamation Act 2005 No 77 anonymous or Nom de Plume comments will not be available until an alternate system of author verification can be investigated and hopefully installed.

Those who provide their REAL NAME (first name AND Surname) and a verifiable email address (it won't be published) are invited to comment below. (yes it is a pain but please comply - it would be a  shame to see your comment deleted)

Those contributors KNOWN to us and verified may continue to use their First Name for ease. The primary need for all of this is due to traceability should a legal action arise.

If you need anonymity email us via our normal or encrypted email accounts


Please note that if you are looking for a previous comment that is no longer visible please contact us.